1. Employment Disputes

CIVIL MEDIATION

Resolve your dispute quicker with a cost effective alternative to court.

Commercial / Business
Workplace / Employment
Community / Neighbours
Domestic / Elder / Property
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COMMERCIAL & BUSINESS DISPUTES

Commercial Disputes

Contract Performance

Partnership Governance

Joint Ventres & Franchising

Financial, Creditors & Debtors

Intellectual Property

Customer Complaints

Ongoing disputes affect productivity and your business bottom line. 

Litigation can take months to get a hearing and cost thousands in preparation and other legal fees. And a public hearing can affect your hard earned brand.

Mediation is quicker, cheaper and confidential.

A commercial dispute is a disagreement arising in trade or commerce, usually involving an agreement or contract. 

Informal negotiation between the parties themselves is often the first attempt at resolving such disputes, but often the assistance of a third party can be effective.

Mediation can guide parties to work together in coming to a creative solution that is workable to all parties.
WHAT HAPPENS?
GETTING STARTED
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WORKPLACE & EMPLOYMENT  DISPUTES

Employment Conditions

Industrial Relations

Performance Management

Interpersonal Relationships

Change Management

​Teams and Projects

The distraction of ongoing disputes in the workplace affects the business bottom line.

With a high success rate, the mediation process can assist Human Resources to identify reoccurring issues and tailor appropriate solutions.

Disputes between employees, or employees and their managers can reduce productivity and may result in higher turnover.

In addition to the loss of productivity, ongoing disputes can lead to expensive and time consuming litigation.

Mediation is particularly useful where the parties would like to maintain an ongoing working relationship. We'll help the parties to develop their own solution that is mutually agreeable.
WHAT HAPPENS?
GETTING STARTED
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COMMUNITY & NEIGHBOUR DISPUTES

Neighbours

Boundaries, Trees, Fences

Body Corporate

Community Groups

Social Groups

Sporting Teams

​Volunteering

Mediation is particularly useful in situations where the parties will likely need to continue communicating in the future - such as living closely or working together.

There are a number of avenues open for tenancy and body corporate disputes, however, mediation remains a quick and effective solution. ​

Non profit and volunteer organisations can often face similar problems faced in employment situations. Mediation can assist parties in resolving their disputes quickly so they can get back to doing what's important.

Outcomes Mediation is happy to assist non-profit, charitable and volunteer organisations with discount and pro-bono mediations.
WHAT HAPPENS?
GETTING STARTED
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DOMESTIC, ELDER CARE AND SETTLEMENT DISPUTES

Elder Care & Support

Succession Planning, Wills and Estates

Power of Attorney, Probate Executors and Administrators

Real Estate & Property Settlements

Domestic Matters for Mediation

Elder Mediation

Preparing for the ongoing care or dealing with the loss of a loved one can be a very stressful time.

Using a neutral third party in a confidential and supportive setting can assist parties to maintain ongoing relationships while working through disputes.

Mediation is also a quicker and confidential way to resolve disputes relating to the execution or administration of Wills and Power of Attorney.
​​"Elder mediators can assist older people, their families and significant others with difficult conversations, to make plans and to reach outcomes to disagreements – outcomes that work for the older persons, respect their rights and enhance their safety."
- Elder Mediation Australasian Network (EMAN)

Outcomes Mediation is proud to be associated with EMAN and providing services to give a voice to older people in our community.

Elder Mediation
WHAT HAPPENS?
GETTING STARTED
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WHAT HAPPENS DURING MEDIATION​​

On the day of the mediation, the parties (and any support person if present) are welcomed and lead to their separate breakout rooms. The parties then come together in the mediation room to commence the discussion. The room is often set out like an office boardroom, and sometimes less formal with comfortable chairs around a coffee table. There is often a whiteboard or projector screen in the room for the mediator to highlight the agenda and points of agreement.
Mediation is flexible and informal. The mediator follows a process to guide the parties through frank discussions about their issues until they are ready to work together to generate agreeable options, negotiate the finer points and then put their agreement in writing. If the parties can't agree, the mediator will note the points that have been agreed so far, ready for further negotiations.​​​
  1. NEGOTIATING

    AGREEMENT

    With options agreed in principle, the finer details can be negotiated down to the point where both parties agree.

    The mediator can help with reality testing each option and commences noting down the outcomes.
    The goal for mediation is a written agreement that both parties can sign as a binding contract.

    If agreement can't be finalised, the mediator can draft a 'heads of agreement' document that can be used for further negotiation.

    In some circumstances, if the parties choose, the agreement can be made into court orders.
  2. SEPARATE SESSIONS

    OPTION GENERATING

    There may be times where the mediator calls a separate session. This is usually to give the parties a chance to consider what had been said, to think about possible solutions, or just recompose if the process becomes challenging.

    These sessions are confidential so parties can use this time to discuss their concerns with the mediator and reality test options. Multiple separate sessions may be used throughout the mediation.
    The parties work together to come up with possible solutions and options to consider at the negotiation stage.

    This is where the parties can really get creative and are encouraged to 'think outside the box' for creative solutions.
  3. AGENDA SETTING

    EXPLORING THE ISSUES

    The mediator summarises the opening statements and sets an agenda of the issues to be discussed leading to an agreement.

    All parties are encouraged to have their say about what is important to discuss in order to move towards resolution.

    The Agenda us usually written up on a whiteboard and referred to throughout the session.
    The mediator facilitates a frank and open discussion between the parties on each of the issues on the agenda.

    This stage often helps parties to see the other party's perspective and start to think about creative solutions.
  4. INDIVIDUAL INTAKE SESSIONS

    OPENING STATEMENTS

    Separate sessions with each party, usually a few days prior to the mediation taking place.

    For the mediator, its the assessment stage - is mediation the best or the most suitable solution for this dispute?

    For the parties, its the preparation stage - time to clarify their issues and understand the mediation process. The mediator can also help the parties with referrals to support services if needed.
    The mediation starts with the mediator summarising the process and setting the ground rules for the session.

    Each party then has an opportunity to make an uninterrupted statement of the issues and what is important to them.
PREPARING
GETTING STARTED
When tensions run high? 

Sometimes, disputes can become emotional and draining. The mediator will often call for separate sessions where the parties with go to their break out rooms and meet with the mediator. These separate sessions often help to reset emotional tension and clear the mind.

In rare cases were there is a risk of aggression or violence, safety measures are put in place to ensure parties remain separate. The mediation may be conducted as a 'shuttle' where the mediator moves back and forth between the separated parties. In high level violence cases or where there are violence orders in place from the courts, the mediation may be conducted via telephone or video conference.

HOW TO PREPARE FOR MEDIATION​​

Find out about Mediation

Think about what you want

Understand your rights

Understand your responsibilities

Collect documents

Prepare your opening statement

​​It is important to be well prepared to make the most out of mediation.

Gather all relevant information that you may want to refer during the mediation session. These may include financial statements, and receipts if relevant.

At the mediation, you will be asked to make an opening statement about what has brought you to mediation - prepare to briefly outline the issues that are important to you.

Come to mediation with an open mind and preparedness to act in good faith with the other party and the mediator.
The mediation intake session is a good time to clarify any questions you may have about mediations.  The mediator will also explain each step throughout the process.

Take time to think about what you want from the mediation and what is most important to you. Also think about what might be important to the other party.

Have you sought legal advice? Discuss mediation, your rights, responsibilities and realistic outcomes with your lawyer.
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HOW TO GET STARTED​​

The first step starts with a phone call or email to us. 

We won't dig into too much detail about the dispute at this stage, we need to keep impartial. But we will be happy to discuss the mediation process and suitability so you can make an informed decision about your next steps.

We can also provide information on inviting the other party to mediation. Alternatively, we can undertake this process for you after your initial intake session.

You may invite your lawyer or other support person to the mediation.
 
Your privacy is important to us and we aim to keep all conversations completely confidential and ensure we're talking to the right person when we return your call.



Located in Milton Brisbane
Call or email us today for a confidential discussion.
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